Weight Calculator

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There some weight tools to calculate your ideal body weight with different formulas. There is always a difference between theory and reality. Yet, it can help to stay in touch with your goals and your health.

calculation weight tools

Weight

You have several ways to calculate your ideal weight. Unfortunately, none are accurate due to many factors (muscle mass, lean body mass, fat, etc.).

Here you can use four different formulas to estimate your ideal weight and BMI. BMI stands for Body Mass Index, it is a value derived from the mass (weight) and height of a person. Each formula gives you a number to hit and BMI gives you a range of weights.

Equations for men:

  • Robinson formula: 52 kg + 1.9 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Miller formula: 56.2 kg + 1.41 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Hamwi formula: 48.0 kg + 2.7 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Devine formula: 50.0 kg + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet.

Equations for women:

  • Robinson formula: 49 kg + 1.7 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Miller formula: 53.1 kg + 1.36 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Hamwi formula: 45.5 kg + 2.2 kg per inch over 5 feet.
  • Devine formula: 45.5 kg + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet.

Equations for BMI:

BMI = weight/height². The optimal, healthy range for BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9.

Enter your height and see the results. You can change the metric by clicking on the blue word and select yours in the drop-down.

Ideal Weight Calculator

Calorie

As with your body weight, your recommended intake or total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) depends on many factors. Height, weight, age, and gender help measure it.

For example, a 40-year-old man who has physical labor (equal to exercising 6 days a week). He is 5’9 ” tall and weighs 194.7 lbs. He should ingest 3567 calories per day.

Another example, an 18-year-old woman. She is 5’4 ” tall, weighs 117 lbs, and works out once a week. She should ingest 1814 calories.

Calories are measures of energy. 1 calorie is equal to about 4.18 joules. Usually, in nutrition, they use kilocalories (kcal). This means that 1 kcal is equal to one thousand “small” calories. As you would expect, 1 kcal = 4.18 kJ.

This calorie calculator uses the Mifflin – St Jeor equation. It helps you find your basal metabolic rate (BMR). BMR is the number of calories your body needs to perform basic vital functions.

Equations:

BMR (men) = (10 * weight / 1kg + 6.25 * height / 1cm – 5 * age / 1 year + 5) kcal / day

BMR (women) = (10 * weight / 1kg + 6.25 * height / 1cm – 5 * age / 1 year – 161) kcal / day

After you find your BMR, you need to multiply it by a factor that matches your level of physical activity:

  • Slightly active lifestyle (light exercise or sports 1-2 days/week): 1.4
  • Moderately active lifestyle (moderate exercise or sports 2-3 days/week): 1.6
  • Very active lifestyle (hard exercise or sports 4-5 days/week): 1.75
  • Extra active lifestyle (very hard exercise, physical job or sports 6-7 days/week): 2.0
  • Professional athlete: 2.3

If in doubt about your activity level, select a lower number. Many people overestimate how much they exercise. It’s safer to assume that you are not as active as you might think when it comes to losing weight. The result will be your TDEE – Total Daily Energy Expenditure.

Calorie Calculator

Calorie variations

This is a calculator that gives you a quick estimate of how many calories you should eat each day. Use the ideal body weight calculator if you don’t know your healthy body weight range.

This calculator uses a medical paper, that states:

  • To lose weight, you need to consume 10-12 kcal per lbs (12 kcal).
  • To maintain weight, you need to consume 14-16 kcal per lbs (15 kcal).
  • To gain weight, you need to consume 17-20 kcal per lbs (18 kcal).

This calorie intake calculator gives you a quick and rough answer. It uses the number per pound that the average person would need to consume to reach their goal weight. But be aware that the number of calories per pound may differ depending on your gender, age, etc.

Another thing, people say calories. The proper name is kilocalories (kcal) – 1000 times more than a calorie. For example, someone needs 15 kcal (kilocalorie), which means 15,000 cal (calories).

Equations to maintain weight:

weight (lbs) * 15 (kcal) = kilocalories to maintain weight

If you use SI units, multiply your weight in kilograms by 33:

weight (kg) * 33 (kcal) = kilocalories to maintain weight

Equations to gain muscle:

weight (lbs) * 18 (kcal) = kilocalories to gain weight

If you know your weight in kilograms, just multiply it by 39.6:

weight (kg) * 39.6 (kcal) = kilocalories to gain weight

Equations to lose weight:

weight (lbs) * 12 (kcal) = kilocalories to lose weight

In case you use SI units, you should multiply your weight in kilograms by 26.4:

weight (kg) * 26.4 (kcal) = kilocalories to lose weight

Calorie Intake Calculator (Simple)

Summary
Weight tools
Article Name
Weight tools
Description
Free tools to calculate your ideal weight. Select your type of metric (cm, kg, inches, lbs, etc), enter your height and check the results.
Stephane Andre
thestephaneandre
Thestephaneandre
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